Table of Contents

  • Acknowledgments vii
  • List of Tables and Charts xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • The Population xv
  • The Theoretical Basis for the Program xvii
  • Finding Content for the Uncapping Family Wisdom Program xix
  • A Program for Treating Transgenerational Dysfunction xxi
  • Significance to the Field of Therapy xxiii
  • How the Book Is Organized xxiv
  • Continuing Process xxv

Part I—The Background Material Needed for the Program 3

1. Origin and Oracles 5

  • Transgenerational Dysfunction 5
  • Origin 6
  • Instinctive Searching 8
  • A Family Intervention Program 9
  • Six Reasons Uncapping Family Wisdom Principles Succeed 11
  • Oracles 13

2. Searching for a Paradigm 17

  • The Search for a New Paradigm 19
  • Finding the Cause 22
  • Understanding the Paradigm 26
  • The Importance of Conceptual Information 27

3. Language and Lects 30

  • Neuroscience, Psycholinguistics, and Sociolinguistics 31
  • New and Older Ideas in Agreement 32
  • Psycholinguistic and Sociolinguistic Ideas 33
  • Acrolect, the Language of the Advantaged 36
  • Mesolect, the Language of the Middle Class 36
  • Basilect, the Language of the Socially Disadvantaged 37
  • Nist’s Conclusions Concerning the Lects 37
  • The Work of Ruby Payne 38
  • Psycholinguistic and Sociolinguistic Application 45
  • Building a Community for Uncapping Family Wisdom 45

4. Linguistic Legacies and Their Effect on Human Development 48

  • Conceptual Language and Human Development 49
  • Objective Observation of Human Development 49
  • Human Development Potential 52
  • Same Transgenerational Developmental Levels in Family Members 53
  • General Semantics of the Family 55
  • The Effect of Linguistics on Developmental Tasks 55
  • Constructs 57

5. Preparing the Environment for the Uncapping Family Wisdom Program 61

  • Understanding Trauma-Organized Families 62
  • The Uncapping Family Wisdom Environment 66
  • Understanding the Process of the Program 67

Part II—Recognizing, Treating, and Reconciling

  • Transgenerational Dysfunction 73

6. Characteristics of a Strong Family 77

  • Family Psychotherapy Models 78
  • The Relationship between the Facilitator and the Families 80
  • Case Study Research 81
  • Case Study Research #1—Amy 81
  • Case Study Research #2—Kay 82
  • Case Study Research #3—Charles 84
  • Case Study Research #4—Paul 85
  • Summary of the Beginning Case Study Research 86
  • Moving into the Meeting Environment 87

7. Communication in the Family System 99

  • Historical Ideas on Language 99
  • Structural Violence in Society and Families 101
  • Missing Affirmations in the Language of Family Speaking Patterns 102
  • Case Study Research Semantic Evaluation 102
  • Case Study Research #1—Amy 103
  • Case Study Research #2—Kay 105
  • Case Study Research #3—Charles 107
  • Case Study Research #4—Paul 109
  • Moving into the Meeting Environment 113
  • Communication Barriers 113
  • Bridges to Communication 120

8. Developmental Impact and Momentum 126

  • Defense Mechanisms 127
  • Linguistic Legacy and Its Effect on Human Development 127
  • Supplying Developmental Permissions 128
  • Cognitive Development 130
  • Trauma Organization in Families 131
  • Case Study Research #1—Amy 132
  • Case Study Research #2—Kay 135
  • Case Study Research #3—Charles 138
  • Case Study Research #4—Paul 140
  • Moving into the Meeting Environment 145
  • Affirmation Ovals 150

9. The Testing Ground—Adventures in Application 162

  • Leadership Styles 163
  • Moving into the Meeting Environment 165
  • First Meeting—Preparing for Home Management 167
  • Second Meeting—Implementing Home Management 175
  • Parents’ Guide 176
  • Having a Family Meeting to Create a Positive Work Climate 177

10. The Art of Modifying Behavior 183

  • The Meeting: Determining Who Will Attend 183
  • Moving into the Meeting Environment 184
  • Introduction: The Art of Modifying Behavior 185
  • Beginning Behavior Modification 190
  • The Stern Model of Discipline 192
  • Family Systems Application of the Stern Model of Discipline 196
  • Conscious Will: The Self-Portrait of the Mind 197

11. Shame Diffusion and Community Building 200

  • Moving into the Meeting Environment 200
  • Breaking the Cycle of Shame in Family Systems 201
  • Community Building 205

Part III—Summary of Linguistic Interventions

  • Developmental Process for Case Studies 215

12. Gaining Closure on Transgenerational Dysfunction 217

  • Case Study Research #1—Amy 217
  • Family Semantic Evaluation 218
  • Analysis of Developmental Progress 220
  • Case Study Research #2—Kay 228
  • Family Semantic Evaluation 228
  • Analysis of Developmental Progress 230
  • Case Study Research #3—Charles 238
  • Family Semantic Evaluation 238
  • Analysis of Developmental Progress 240
  • Case Study Research #4—Paul 248
  • Family Semantic Evaluation 248
  • Analysis of Developmental Progress 251
  • Summary 259
  • Concluding Comments 265
  • A Living Instrument 265
  • Index 267

List of Tables and Charts

Tables

Sample Table with Detailed Specifications of Complex Design

  • Table 4.1The Effects of Semantic Interventions on Development over Four Months 51

Analysis of Linguistic Legacy

  • Table 7.1Case Study Research #1—Amy 104
  • Table 7.2Case Study Research #2—Kay 107
  • Table 7.3Case Study Research #3—Charles 109
  • Table 7.4Case Study Research #4—Paul 112

Developmental Analysis

  • Table 8.1Case Study Research #1—Amy 134
  • Table 8.2Case Study Research #2—Kay 137
  • Table 8.3Case Study Research #3—Charles 139
  • Table 8.4Case Study Research #4—Paul 142

Interventions in Linguistic Legacy and Its Effect on Human Development

  • Table 12.1 Case Study Research #1—Amy – Cognitive Development 221
  • Table 12.2Case Study Research #1—Amy – Social Development 223
  • Table 12.3Case Study Research #1—Amy – Psychosocial Development 225
  • Table 12.4Case Study Research #1—Amy – Moral Development 227
  • Table 12.5Case Study Research #2—Kay – Cognitive Development 231
  • Table 12.6Case Study Research #2—Kay – Social Development 233
  • Table 12.7Case Study Research #2—Kay – Psychosocial Development 235
  • Table 12.8Case Study Research #2—Kay – Moral Development 237
  • Table 12.9Case Study Research #3—Charles – Cognitive Development 241
  • Table 12.10Case Study Research #3—Charles – Social Development 243
  • Table 12.11Case Study Research #3—Charles – Psychosocial Development 245
  • Table 12.12Case Study Research #3—Charles – Moral Development 247
  • Table 12.13Case Study Research #4—Paul – Cognitive Development 252
  • Table 12.14Case Study Research #4—Paul – Social Development 254
  • Table 12.15Case Study Research #4—Paul – Psychosocial Development 256
  • Table 12.16Case Study Research #4—Paul – Moral Development 258

Multi-Case Research Study of Combined Information from Case Study Research 1-4

  • Table 12.17Multi-Case Study Research 260
  • Table 12.18Analysis of Comparative Cognitive Development Gains 261
  • Table 12.19Analysis of Comparative Social Development Gains 262
  • Table 12.20Analysis of Comparative Psychosocial Development Gains 263
  • Table 12.21Analysis of Comparative Moral Development Gains 264

Charts

  • Could You Survive in Poverty? 39
  • Could You Survive in Middle Class? 40
  • Could You Survive in Wealth? 41
  • Hidden Rules Among Classes 43
  • Correlation of selected defense mechanisms with global assessments of mental health from The NEW HARVARD GUIDE TO PSYCHIATRY 54

Affirmation Ovals

  • Prenatal Stage—From Conception to Birth 151
  • Being Affirmations—From Birth to 6 Months 152
  • Doing Affirmations—From 6 to 18 Months 153
  • Thinking Affirmations—From 18 Months to 3 Years 154
  • Identity and Power Affirmations—From 3 to 6 Years 155
  • Structure Affirmations—From 6 to 12 Years 156
  • Identity, Sexuality, and Separation Affirmations—From 12 to 19 Years 157
  • Interdependence Affirmations—Adults 158
  • Integration Toward Death 159